Travel, Food & Wine

Mercedes-Benz appreciating experiences that inspire and delight.

The world is diverse, colourful and flavourful. As a brand we savour innovation, whether it’s on the road, in the air or at the dining table. Innovation is also at the heart of modern cuisine and fine wine – savouring the new, experiencing the unique and letting your sense guide you in unexpected directions. Like travel, those who make their way to their destination by car experience stories on the way that otherwise would have remained hidden. This is how a Mercedes-Benz becomes a kind of home on the way. Along the route, special places inspire drivers. Whether it’s a new model or a classic, a Mercedes-Benz reliably guides its passengers to the remotest places and makes the road trip a wonderful, unforgettable event.


Partnerships


Partnerships

Mercedes-Benz x Mt Buller

Mercedes-Benz x Mt Buller

Mercedes-Benz x Mt Buller

Mercedes-Benz will continue to partner with Mt Buller in 2019

Mercedes-Benz will continue to partner with Mt Buller in 2019

Stories


Luxe and local in Monaco

July 2019

Stories


Luxe and local in Monaco

July 2019

Terre de Monaco

Jessica Sbaraglia established Terre de Monaco to improve urban agriculture in Monaco. Image: © Terre de Monaco.

Monaco is on track to be completely carbon neutral by 2050, with just a little bit of help from local producers.

From the southern side of Tour Odéon, a luxury apartment tower in Monte Carlo, the residents have multi-million-dollar views of oversized luxury yachts bobbing in the Mediterranean and a rocky coastline fringed with exclusive hotels. But to the north there’s another, more rustic view: a garden perched on a steep hillside that is home to 30 chickens, 10 beehives, fruit trees and around a dozen large, terraced vegetable plots.

Terre de Monaco founder Jessica Sbaraglia operates five working gardens throughout the city-state. As well as being sold to locals, you can find her heirloom produce in fine-dining restaurants including the Michelin-starred Blue Bay Restaurant at the Monte-Carlo Bay Hotel. “Last year I grew two and a half tonnes of food,” says Sbaraglia as she affectionately pets one of her favourite Silkie hens, “and my chickens ate three tonnes of scraps donated by three hotels and three bakeries.”

Terre de Monaco

Image: Justine Costigan.

Reducing waste and eating local is one of the many ways the hospitality and tourism industry is getting behind Monaco’s ambition to become carbon neutral by 2050. The goal is supported by Prince Rainier II, whose eponymous foundation has already given more than 55 million euro in grants to sustainability- and environmental conservation-focused projects.

 

At the Société des Bains de Mer (SBM), the majority principality-owned hotel, casino and entertainment business and owner of the famous Hôtel de Paris and Hermitage hotels, making sustainability a priority has been a decade-long endeavour, with plenty more to do. “Our guests now expect it,” says purchasing manager Dimitri De Andolenko, who has overseen changes from energy use and supply chain to working with businesses such as Terre de Monaco and establishing the company’s own 40-hive-strong apiary.

Perles de Monaco

Image: Visit Monaco.

Frédéric Rouxeville, the co-founder of Perles de Monaco, has been shucking organically grown oysters finished in tubs fed with pristine seawater for 20 years. Located at the end of the Fort de Fontvieille pier, Perles de Monaco supplies more than 20 tonnes of oysters to restaurants throughout Monaco and to customers who love to sit at the pier’s rustic tables as they eat. It’s all about the flavour for Rouxeville, who keeps service simple. “Just a squeeze of lemon, or nothing at all,” he says.


Reducing waste was the key inspiration for entrepreneur Philip Culazzo, whose L’Orangerie is the first spirit and liqueur to be produced in Monaco. Keen to save the fruit from the region’s iconic orange trees from landfill, Culazzo brings the unwanted oranges to his small Monte Carlo distillery where it is zested, juiced and turned into a bittersweet liqueur and a grappa-style spirit to be sold by the bottle, and at bars and in restaurants throughout Monaco. “I wanted to make something useful,” says Culazzo, “and something that genuinely comes from here.”

Words Justine Costigan

Stories


Bask in the luxury of Fiji’s only over-water bures

July 2019

Stories


Bask in the luxury of Fiji’s only over-water bures

July 2019

Likuliku Lagoon Resort

Likuliku Lagoon Resort is home to two cocktail bars, including Masima Bar on an island in the central lagoon. Image: © Mark Daffey.

Is that an octopus out in the open? I thought they always hid away among holes and cracks in reefs. And look at that! A lobster is crawling across the ocean floor. Any other time I’ve see one of those, they’ve been safely tucked away inside a crevice. This is how marine life should be observed – through a window in the floor of one’s room, floodlit at night, while wearing a dressing gown.

Likuliku Lagoon Resort’s 10 over-water bures were the first of their kind to be built in Fiji. Suspended above a coral reef teeming with tropical fish, shy crustaceans and elastic molluscs, they’re highly coveted by loved-up couples who like to dip their toes in the water without ever having to go far to do it.

The over-water bures

The over-water bures sit in a stunning protected marine sanctuary. Image: © Mark Daffey.

The floors in the lounge areas have glass sections for viewing the marine life swimming around in the waters beneath the bure. Cavernous bathtubs sit beside windows framing the bay. And ladders off each bure’s private balcony allow occupants to lower themselves into the water to swim or snorkel.

Guests in this luxurious, adults-only resort can also stay in one of three garden, 14 standard or 18 deluxe beachfront bures. Deluxe versions boast their own plunge pool and private sunbed, with authentically Fijian timber furnishings.

It was among the thick jungle foliage outside one of these bures that a Fijian crested iguana was spotted in 2010, years after the emerald-hued reptile was thought to be extinct. The resort has since led the way in preservation efforts designed to ensure the critically endangered lizard’s survival, leading to its accreditation as one of National Geographic’s Unique Lodges of the World.

Masima Island

Don't forget to snap a few photos from the walkway to Masima Island. Image: © Mark Daffey.

Other activities on offer include cultural tours to neighbouring villages, which many staff members return home to at night. The snorkelling around the bay, a protected marine reserve, is as good as anywhere in the region. And complimentary kayaks, stand-up paddleboards, windsurfers and catamarans are available during daylight hours.

 

Away from the island, one excursion not to be missed is a sunrise trip to Mociu or Honeymoon Island, where hearty breakfast hampers complement 360-degrees vistas. There are fishing excursions and boat tours around the Mamanuca Islands.

 

Therapy sessions in the resort’s Tatadra Spa relax mind and body. And the delicious meals, sourced locally whenever possible and dished up by Executive Chef Shane Watson and his Fijiana Restaurant team, are truly mouth-watering. Even with octopus on the menu.

Words and images Mark Daffey. He visited Likuliku Lagoon Resort courtesy of Ahura Resorts.